Self-Editing Tip: Plot

If you’re writing fiction, you need a plot, dynamic characters, action, conflict, plausible dialogue, and a resolution (even if you are writing serially).

With regards to plot, you need an introduction, or Act I, where the primary characters (including all of the suspects in a crime story), the initial setting, and the main conflict are revealed. Too much backstory can put the reader to sleep. Not enough backstory means the reader is confused. One good way to reveal backstory is through a short vignette, where a microcosm of the story is told through a brief incident that reveals something important about a primary character. The brief scene in the original Tim Burton Batman, where young Bruce Wayne’s parents are shot by the young Joker–who says the Joker catch phrase to the boy before running off–is a great example of this kind of tease. In James Cameron’s Avatar, the uncut version (Blue Ray) shows a much longer introduction, where Jake is seen fighting, despite his wheelchair, and the viewer is shown scenes of planet Earth engulfed in smoke and devoid of greenery. This was cut for the theatrical version, where instead Jake simply says the Earth is devoid of greenery. Pick your battles.

The second part of the plot is the action, the meat of the story, or Act II. A story where the good guy swoops in and whoops on the bad guy is boring. It might make a decent Vine or YouTube video, but it doesn’t make for a good novel or movie. The hero has to suffer, lose, get embarrassed, and his or her story has to have stress and woe. Otherwise, the reader or viewer might not feel sympathetic. The hero’s hopes and dreams have to be dashed in the second act. It’s like pulling the rubber band as far back as you can. It stretches, it moans, it hurts, and you know something’s going to give soon.

The third act is where the hero finds a way to overcome the conflict, the bad guy, the negative situation. In Steven Spielberg’s Always, the third act is where Dorinda faces her greatest fear, flies into the heart of the forest fire, and then, with Pete’s help, she ditches the damaged plane and swims to the surface. Pete lets her finally go, and is free to move on to the next phase of existence.

When you finish your first draft, give your book a few days to cool. Then read over it and make notes (I use Excel) about your plot points. Are you following the three-act structure? Does your story reveal information in a way that makes sense to the reader? Is your plot pace variable, or does it march predictably?

These are some of the many things I look for when I edit my clients’ books. I want them to sing and shine. I want readers to eat up my clients’ books and beg for more.

Contact me at steppenwolfedww@hotmail.com, because your book deserves an extra dose of awesome!

Advertisements

Editing Science Fiction

Some say science fiction is a slowly dying genre. But I think there is still a market for it. The challenge with sci-fi is that a lot of writers invest so much mental bandwidth developing a compelling environment, or intriguing fictional technology, that they neglect the two most important aspects of story-telling—character development and story development.

It’s great to come up with an original setting, or the next kind of phaser or light saber, or special super powers that no one has thought of before. But the characters still need to have flaws, they need plausible motivation, and they need to have realistic relationships with each other, bad or good. Good guys need to have a little darkness, and bad guys need a tiny spark of humanity.

Dialog needs to be crisp, sometimes amusing, but always realistic and appropriate for the setting. Too much yippee ki yay and the reader starts to feel like they’ve already read this story. But a lack of humor can also turn away a reader.

The story still needs to follow the Three-Act structure, and a little romance goes a long way in sci-fi. But in this genre, more explosions and fewer smooches are usually a good idea.

I can help you develop your story, brainstorm ideas—outlandish or realistic—and help you keep your characters and dialog sharp and engaging. Contact me at steppenwolfedww@hotmail.com, because your book deserves an extra dose of awesome!